Metro Transit rejects Godless ad

Discussion in 'Reality Check' started by bnguitarman, Feb 5, 2009.

  1. bnguitarman

    Shmir-nup

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    I don't have a problem with this as long as Metro Transit would have the same stance on any religeous banners. I can see that they don't want to create any controversy.

    I don't know, however, if this is the right way for Humanist Canada to express their views. I don't really think they have to advertise it. If someone wants to believe, let them believe. If they don't want to believe, that is their choice as well. We can all make our own decisions on religeon.
     
  2. Mystik

    New Member

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    IMO Religion should never be advertised in any form at all.
     
  3. bnguitarman

    Shmir-nup

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    Exactly, whether its "believe in my god" or "there is no god" it should be up to each individual :)
     
  4. visual_kool

    Well-Known Member

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    My god has a bigger dick then your god
     
  5. Leroy

    @danackles29

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    My dick has a bigger God than your Dick.
     
  6. hank

    Well-Known Member

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    They let one slip through and then pulled it when people commented/complained about it :lol:
     
  7. JAC

    JAC
    Brathair Brewing

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    Does Jebus take the bus?..if so, to where?
     
  8. Shellie

    Team Suzuki

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    Atheist transit ads will run
    SCOC decision upholds freedom of speech in bus advertising
    By IAN FAIRCLOUGH Staff Reporter and The Canadian Press
    Sat. Jul 11 - 4:46 AM

    [The Supreme Court has ruled that BC Transit must allow ads from an atheist organization, so Metro Transit in Halifax will follow suit. (Christian Laforce / Staff)</p>]

    The Supreme Court has ruled that BC Transit must allow ads from an atheist organization, so Metro Transit in Halifax will follow suit. (Christian Laforce / Staff)



    A Supreme Court of Canada decision on freedom of speech in bus advertising means Metro Transit will run atheist ads from a national organization.

    The 8-0 decision, released Friday, ruled against transit officials in British Columbia who had refused to run ads from the Canadian Federation of Students and the British Columbia Teachers’ Federation.

    BC Transit and TransLink had said their policy bars political ads along with any message "likely to cause offence . . . or create controversy."

    In February, the Freethought Association of Canada tried to book ads on Metro Transit buses in metro Halifax that said: "There’s probably no god, now stop worrying and enjoy your life." Transit authorities refused to run them, saying they were "objectionable to a certain group."

    Metro Transit spokeswoman Lori Patterson said Friday that many transit systems across the country have taken the view that "because we are a bus first and a billboard second, that we didn’t accept anything that we knew to be objectionable."

    She said that stance is similar to the B.C. one about causing offence or creating controversy, so Metro Transit will respect the court decision and allow the ads to run.

    "Yes, when they apply, they can . . . purchase the ads."

    Kevin Kindred, local spokesman for the Ontario-based Freethought Association, said the group will submit the ads on Monday. He said running the ads is "good for Halifax, good for public discussion, and a right we have that is protected by the charter."

    The B.C. court case developed after the student and teacher groups tried to place ads on buses during the provincial election campaign in 2005.

    The student federation had hoped to run an image of a crowd at a concert with the text: "Register now. Learn the issues. Vote May 17, 2005." The teachers union wanted to post a banner saying: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 schools closed. Our students. Your kids. Worth speaking out for."

    The Supreme Court pointedly noted that bus officials had no problem running commercial ads. It also said their policy of trying to vanquish all controversy "is unnecessarily broad."

    "Citizens, including bus riders, are expected to put up with some controversy in a free and democratic society," Justice Marie Deschamps wrote.

    Still, she said, there are times when messages in publicly governed spaces can be justifiably restricted. The fact that buses are used by an essentially captive audience, including children, must be considered.

    "Thus, limits on advertising are contextual," she said.

    Justice Deschamps said she does not "see any aspect of the location that suggests that expression within it would undermine the values underlying free expression. On the contrary, the space allows for expression by a broad range of speakers to a large public audience."

    "I therefore conclude that the side of a bus is a location where expressive activity is protected by . . . the charter."

    Other cities, including Vancouver, Victoria and London, Ont., had rejected the Freethought Association’s ads, while Montreal, Toronto and Calgary had accepted them. Ottawa had rejected them at first but reversed that decision because it feared a costly legal fight.

    The atheist message has been placed on public transit systems in the U.S. and several European countries, including Italy, Spain and the Netherlands, since last year.

    ( ifairclough@herald.ca)

    http://thechronicleherald.ca/Front/1131887.html
     
  9. Duggan

    Well-Known Member

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    jewsus is the man
     
  10. 17

    17
    teenage dirtbag

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    JUST A STRANGER ON A BUS, TRYIN TO MAKE HIS WAY HOOOOOOOOME
     
  11. Duggan

    Well-Known Member

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    Jew-el, hmmm I am seeing a pattern
     
  12. tommi

    Active Member

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    pattern, hmmm I am seeing a Jew-el
     
  13. Muricane

    MY AV IS ME

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    I'm going to regret posting this, but it's not jew-el, it's Jew-on Osborne.
     
  14. CoupeDeVille

    illest mofo in a cardigan

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    Some Calgary buses have "God Probably Doesn't Exist....Now Enjoy Your Life" plastered all over the side of them. It's a matter of opinion, I don't see the problem.

    Personally, I don't think Halifax is going to progress until all the old fogies kick the bucket.
     
  15. Horsman

    White Man in a Black Suit

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    or we push them down the stairs.
     

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