Fiber-glass...

Discussion in 'Automotive' started by HW, Nov 15, 2003.

  1. HW

    HW
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    Can anyone help me out with this or give me a good website for a first-timer? Need to fix some bumpers and a seat for a go kart.
     
  2. ~La~Aruca~

    try to lick ur elbow

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    i'd say just jump in to the seat for the go-cart, and see what u can do...cuz u have all the stuff right. then if it turns out good go to the bumper
     
  3. VR6in

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    I had my first experience with it the other weekend while fixing up my winter beater. It's not hard to do, just get the resin, hardner, old paint brushes, and the matt..........WEAR rubber gloves too, lol, that stuff is a bitch to get off! Oh year, get some acitone(sp?) to clean everything with. I doubled up on the matt where ever I used it to make it stronger too. It was pretty easy but to do a really nice clean smooth job take a lot of time and practice........I just did a rough job. Oh yeah, if you can get a roller too that would help a lot, easier to get the air bubbles out.
     
  4. bluenosersx

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    good friend of mine does fiberglassing as a job (at glubees) if you want him to do something let me know.
     
  5. stu mccrea

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    HW.

    There really isn't a good site for the first timer.

    Things to consider are the size of repair, the resin used in the orignal build or epoxy. Also how many mils is the the piece thick, structural load, etc etc etc.

    Basic, if you have a hole in the glass, then you want to grind it out in a circle, making sure to taper the edges (in other words make the the hole look and shaped like a cone). Then take some fibreglass mat, cut to the dia of the hole, then take a piece of cloth (dependant upon strenght, 6 oz is easiest to use). Repeat this process till you come flush or just above the original surface. One tip is that you always want to finish with fibreglass mat or leave just enough of an impression from the orignial sureface so that you can then fill it (usually done if the piece is painted).

    Then you will want to mix the resin/ epoxy up in small batches (watch out, a bad mixture will melt anything plastic, for example a old pop bottle will look like a science experiment gone bad. Take an old brush, or dependant upon the size a roller. You would like to wet the surface first, then place the mat or cloth on first, then brush on more. You can do what is called wet out, where you wet the pieces first then put them on, but this usually ends up with voids (air inside), which you will never see. Its best to do the repair in the above way

    Bear in mind, two maybe three lay ups (the circles you cut) should be done at a time, any more and that science experiment in your cup or bottle will end up happening on the repaired piece. Let the layups dry and repeat, of course this is dependant upon the thickness of repair.

    If the surface is painted, then grab some high density filler, 3m bubbles, mix that with resin or epoxy till it thick as paste, then using flexible spreader, spread the filler over the impression. Finally sand with 220 grit, then 320 till you reach 600.

    If its gelcoat, then the process is similar to the top, expect you won't want very much of an impression.

    Through some question on here if you want
     

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